Archive for September, 2008

New KVM Goodness.

September 30, 2008

I ditched my old KVM and looked around for a 4 computer model that would work with my 30″ monitor.  I’m trying maximize the surface area on my desk.  Happily, I found one:

Here it is in action:

Right now, I only have one computer plugged into it.  The plan is to slowly build 2 more and perhaps buy a Mac Pro for the 4th.

I’ll do a follow up review on this in the future.
IOGEAR GCS1204 4PORT DVI KVMP SWITCH W/ 2.1 AUDIO DUAL LINK
(Oooh, cheaper here)
IOGear GCS1204 4-Port Dual Link DVI KVMP with 2.1 Audio

Friday Night Party Line #35.

September 27, 2008

Hmmm, it seems that I have not blogged in 2 weeks.  Ah well.

Timo the Physicist is our special guest!  David, Scott, Rym and Thaed round out the cast.  This show is devoted entirely to science and economics tonight.

Here are the topics:

Ask the Economist:  new ideas on alternative currencies
http://www.boingboing.net/2008/09/23/what-went-wrong.html

Update on the Large Hadron Collider from someone who knows.

Should the government fund pure science?

Is the Black Swan concept important to theoretical modeling?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_swan_theory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludic_fallacy

Sites where you can find more information about Scott, Rym and Thaed:

http://www.frontrowcrew.com
http://www.mentalinterface.net

Subscribe via iTunes.

Email Thaed at thaed@cox.net
Follow Thaed on Twitter.
Direct download: FNPL_35_final.mp3

Friday Night Party Line 34.

September 13, 2008

David, Scott, Rym & Thaed appeared tonight along with special guest Len from Jawbone Radio.  Here are the topics:

—Do people interact with their neighbors anymore?  Is is seasonal? Does the internet allow like minded people to seek each other out to a greater level of articulation than ever before?  Does that destroy the idea of local community?  Was there ever such a thing as local community?
—Cool robot videos!
http://ostatic.com/172525-blog/open-source-roboticists-on-a-path-to-c3p0
How far away are we from having robots that do our household chores? What are the major hurdles remaining?  If you could have a multipurpose humanoid robot, what would you make it do?
—Creating artificial life
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/09/biologists-on-t.html
Is this something that is helpful to humans?  How far away are we from doing it?  Is there any real danger?
—Does Twitter just distract and annoy?
http://www.businessweek.com/debateroom/archives/2008/09/twitter_distrac.html
—Do kids need to take happiness lessons?
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/sep/10/mentalhealth.happiness
—Ask the Economist.  (please think of something to ask David about, if nothing else we’ll talk about Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae).

Sites where you can find more information about Scott, Rym and Len:

http://www.frontrowcrew.com
http://jawboneradio.blogspot.com/

Subscribe via iTunes.

Email Thaed at thaed@cox.net
Follow Thaed on Twitter.
Direct download: FNPL_34_final.mp3

Building a PC: Tall or Wide?

September 6, 2008

As I see it, anyone who wants to build a computer today needs to make a choice:  should it be built to be as fast as possible without regard to the number of cores or should it have as many cores as possible without clockspeed being a priority?  In other words, should it be tall or wide?

If you want to go tall, it seems to me that you should buy the most expensive dual core chip you can find and then overclock it as far as it will go.  If you could get a dual core up to 4.6 GHz you would have a fast machine indeed.  Couple this with fast memory and a Raptor RAID 0 set up or even a flash drive and you have raw speed.  Of course with only 2 cores, it’s not wide.  But do you need it to be wide?

On the other hand, if you buy a Skulltrail motherboard and put 2 quadcore chips on it, then you’ve got something that’s wide.  You have 8 cores!  Even with overclocking, you probably won’t be able to get to the same speed as the overclocked dual cores.  However, if the software you’re using can handle multicore processing, this computer with smoke the dual core system using that application.

But there aren’t that many programs that can use quadcore chips effectively.  Today, it would seem that you’re better off with a fast dual core than spending crazy money on a quad or dual quad system.  This won’t always be the case, but for probably the next 6 months.  It’s true.

Expensive PC chrome.

September 1, 2008

I like reading both CPU and Maximum PC because I’m very much into computer hardware.  Some people like messing with cars; I like messing with computers.  Some people will pay more for chrome, I’ll pay more for GHz!

In its September 2008 issue, CPU featured some tricked out computers that sell for around $15,000.  That’s the price of a car.  If I were rich, would I buy such a thing?  Because I like building PCs, I probably would never buy a PC like this because I’d rather have the fun putting it together.

Let’s look at one of these.  The Biohazard Rapture impresses me because it uses “multiple evaporator phase-change cooling systems.”  This system allows Biohazard to overclock two QX9775 systems to 4.6GHz on a Skulltrail motherboard.  Whoa.  I mean, daaaaaaamn.  The cooling system brings the processors down to – 20 degrees F.  It’s very difficult for a hobbyist to do something like that.  So here, you’re getting something for your $15k that you can’t really do yourself.

Of course by studying these supercomputers, a hobbyist can see how the big boys do their tricks.  I picked up how to set up Raptor drives in RAID zero from reading about these machines.  I  also got into water cooling this way.  If I bought a Skulltrail mobo and some high end cooling equipment, I could probably create something faster than anything a person could buy at Microcenter.  But there’s no question I could not equal what Biohazard has done.

Could it be done more cheaply?  Relatively speaking, yes.  In this neighborhood of performance the mobo and the chips alone come close to $4,000.  Thus, even if you do it yourself, you’re talking about spending 5 grand.  Now that’s a third of the price of a Rapture, but the performance would be closer than that.  I’m confident that I could get it up to 4 GHz.  I’ve done that with lesser chips.  So while I’ll stipulate that I can’t match the Rapture for $5,000, I can get to 87% for 1/3rd the price.  Moreover, considering the level of diminishing returns right now on using an 8 core box, what difference would it really make day to day?

Sadly, that cuts both ways to me as a computer enthusiast.  You could say to me, “but Thaed, I can buy a Dell for $1000.00 that gives me comparable performance for 1/5 of your $5000.00 price that will be great for Office, Firefox and maybe a little Photoshop.”  And what do I have to say to that?  Well, yeah, but look at the chrome!